How do you sell your Beef?

Kaukiki Beef is sold by the whole, half or quarter by weight.   After initial dressing, each animal is weighed.  That weight (minus the non-edible parts) is the hanging weight. A $200 deposit is needed to hold a beef.

The balance is due after harvest when the final weight is known.

You will need to pay the butcher shop directly for the cutting and wrapping portion when you pick up your animal in frozen, wrapped packages


How do you sell your Lamb?

Kaukiki Lamb is sold by the whole or half.  Just like with beef, after initial dressing, each animal is weighed.  That weight (minus the non-edible parts) is the hanging weight. A $50 deposit is needed to hold lamb.

The balance is due after harvest when the final weight is known.

You will need to pay the butcher shop directly for the cutting and wrapping portion when you pick up your animal in frozen, wrapped packages


How are your animals harvested?

Our friends are harvested here on the farm by an incredibly well respected butcher that we compensate directly. The hanging sides are then transported a local butcher shop for cut and wrap.   We use several different shops and will work with you to find one that is convenient to you and your specific needs.

 


We have never ordered this way before - How do we know what to do?

We'll walk you through the process (and our own lessons learned over the years) to make the cutting and wrapping decisions easier.  Size of packages, and types of cuts really need to suit your cooking preferences and family size.  Also, recipes are available for any cut of meat.   It is our goal to ensure that you not only know how to cook every part of the animal but also that you have something you're excited to make. Our Pinterest site is full of recipe suggestions as well.

How will I know my order is ready to process?

We will contact you prior to work out your needs and to let you know the final weight and cost.  You will receive a phone call and a written invoice at that time.

How much freezer space will I need?

The rule of thumb is 1 cubic foot of freezer space (think milk crate) per 30 pounds of meat.  So a 1/4 of beef will take approximately 4 cubic feet of freezer space (or six brown grocery bags full).  A half lamb takes about one cubic foot of space (or about two brown grocery bags full).  You want to keep in mind that this is in addition to any other food you have stored in your freezer.  If you are ordering a 1/4 beef you should be able to fit it into an average side-by-side freezer but you won't have room for much else.